8 Codes help in the search on Google for the best results

Often when we search for something on Google, we find a lot of results that are far from what we’re looking for, especially if what we’re looking for something obscure (not famous) and we are forced to be re-search more than once until we find what we want and this waste time for this no special engine Google search to help you get closer the results of what you want in the fastest time and the exclusion of results that carry the prospects are weak in achieving what you’re looking for codes, these codes may be helpful in the search for a certain article or a picture or a book or news etc ….

8 BB help in the search on Google for the best results

Now we will learn this codes will probably find it difficult to recall these tags but with use more than once’ll get used to them. Continue reading

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Separation Anxiety: A Tutorial for Isolating Your System with Linux Namespaces

With the advent of tools like Docker, Linux Containers, and others, it has become super easy to isolate Linux processes into their own little system environments. This makes it possible to run a whole range of applications on a single real Linux machine and ensure no two of them can interfere with each other, without having to resort to using virtual machines. These tools have been a huge boon to PaaS providers. But what exactly happens under the hood?

These tools rely on a number of features and components of the Linux kernel. Some of these features were introduced fairly recently, while others still require you to patch the kernel itself. But one of the key components, using Linux namespaces, has been a feature of Linux since version 2.6.24 was released in 2008.

Anyone familiar with chroot already has a basic idea of what Linux namespaces can do and how to use namespace generally. Just as chroot allows processes to see any arbitrary directory as the root of the system (independent of the rest of the processes), Linux namespaces allow other aspects of the operating system to be independently modified as well. This includes the process tree, networking interfaces, mount points, inter-process communication resources and more. Continue reading

Meet Bond, Microsoft Bond – A New Data Serialization Framework

Microsoft Bond is a new serialization framework for schematized data created by Microsoft.

Let’s recap where data serialization is used most:

Data persistence in files, streams, NoSQL, and BigData.
Data transmission in networks, IPC, etc.
Commonly, these applications have to deal with schematized data, where schema means:

Structure: hierarchy, relations, order.
Semantic: age in number of years since born.

Actually, any data has schema even if it is implicitly defined or supported by your programming language out-of-box. When it comes to complex data structures, we end up writing supporting data transfer objects (DTOs) and code responsible for IO, often in different languages. As soon as it grows and evolves, it quickly becomes a nightmare to maintain all these pieces. Here is where the serialization frameworks win the game. Continue reading