Send better email: Configure SPF and DKIM for Google Apps

Google, like most major email providers, actively works to combat forged email, spam, and scam email. For the most part, their defenses work. Open your Gmail spam folder to see the Google spam fighting team’s work. The vast majority of email there will be spam.

If a legitimate email somehow ends up in spam, select the email, then mark it as “Not Spam”. (This is what’s known as a false positive.) Conversely, if a spam email somehow ends up in your Inbox, select the email, and then mark it as “Spam”. Your changes help improve Gmail’s spam filters. Continue reading

How Can I Transfer My Domain from one registrar to another?

This article is a complete guide on how to transfer a domain from one registrar to another and will cover the following information:

  1. What to Do Before Transferring Your Domain
  2. How to Begin Your Domain Transfer
  3. How to Ensure Your Transfer is Uninterrupted
  4. Check Your Transfer Status
  5. Troubleshooting a Failed Transfer

What to Do Before Transferring Your Domain

There are several blocks in place to protect your domain name ownership that can cause difficulty in transferring your domain to a new registrar. Before you transfer your domain, it is essential that you ensure that the domain is ready to be transferred. Please go through below pre transfer checklist for preparing a domain for transfer: Continue reading

Step by Step to Change website hosting without downtime

Switching to a new host can be a complicated process. Follow our steps to ensure that your move is smooth and painless

  1. The first step is to join your new host. Make sure to NOT cancel with your old hosting provider, and do not tell them you will be canceling. Keep this a secret from your old host, or they could prematurely terminate your site and cause downtime.
  2. At this point, you should have hosting accounts with two hosting providers (the old and the new one). You will now migrate your entire site from the old host to the new one. This can be done by connecting to the old host’s FTP and downloading all your files, and then by connecting to the new host’s FTP and uploading all your files (maintain the same file and folder structure).
  3. You must also backup any databases on the old host (contact the old host for instructions) and upload the backup files to the new host via FTP. You must then restore your databases from those backup files; this can be done via SSH or cPanel’s phpMyAdmin. Emails do not normally transfer, but you can archive your emails from the old host. You can accomplish this by making a POP3 connection to each email address; this way all the old emails are downloaded to your local computer. The new host will not have those old emails, but the new host will be able to get new emails.
  4. After you have all your files on both hosting accounts, it is time to change your domain name’s DNS. Your new host will provide you with the correct name servers (DNS). You may need to contact the new host to find out what DNS settings you will use for your domain name.DNS name servers usually looks like this (replace “yourhostname.com” with your host’s actual domain name):
    yourhostname.com
    ns2.yourhostname.com

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How to setup your own smtp mail server in windows xp

Steps to install the SMTP server

  1. Firstly, from the Start menu, click Control Panel.
  2. Go to Add or Remove Programs.
  3. From the left pane, click Add/Remove Windows Components.
  4. From the Components list, click Application Server, and then click Details.
  5. From the Sub components of Application Server list, click Internet Information Services (IIS), and then click Details.
  6. From the Sub components of Internet Information Services (IIS) list, select the SMTP Service check box.
  7. Click OK.
  8. Click Next. You might be prompted for the Windows Server 2003 family CD or the network install path.
  9. Click Finish.

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Troubleshooting DNS problems with Nslookup

If you are running a DNS server on your Windows NT or Windows 2000 network, you know that various problems can arise and cause the system to go haywire. When that happens, you dig into your arsenal of troubleshooting tools and go to work. If you are running Windows NT, chances are you head to the DNS Manager, since it is the primary tool for managing Windows NT DNS name servers. If you are running Windows 2000, you typically head to the DNS Console, since it is the primary tool for administering Windows 2000 DNS name servers.

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