Enable or Disable Windows Firewall from Command Prompt

There may come a time when you need to write a script or remotely connect to a PC and run a command to enable or disable the Windows firewall. For most IT environments, using Group Policy is the easiest way to configure the Windows Firewall on client computers.

It’s also the easiest way to add port exceptions for services such as HTTP, file sharing, software applications, and more. However, it’s also good to know how to configure the Windows Firewall from the command prompt just in case you have computers and servers that are not in Active Directory.

Manage Windows Firewall from Command Prompt

First, to see whether the Windows Firewall is enabled on a server or computer, type this command at the command prompt:

netsh advfirewall show allprofiles

Make sure you open an administrator command prompt (click on Start, type in CMD and then right-click on Command Prompt and choose Run as Administrator). You should get something similar to what is shown below:

Continue reading

How to Change Your IP Address in Windows Using PowerShell

You may know how to change IP address via GUI. It’s pretty easy. Just go to Control panel > network and internet, selecting the IPv4 Properties and change the IP address. This whole process will take around a minute to do so. But what if you have to do it on multiple systems and repeat all these steps multiple times. It will become really tiresome. PowerShell can do this tedious task very easily.

PowerShell may sound difficult to use and you may hesitate to work on it but it has several unique features.

With PowerShell, you can gather information, change system settings and automate most anything on Windows. It’s more powerful than Cmd and offers more flexibility. Tasks done with PowerShell does not only automated but they also save time.

To Open PowerShell, type PowerShell in the search bar of your Windows 10 computer, then press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to launch it with administrator privileges. Continue reading

Windows 10 Development: Addressing Old Problems And Opening New Doors For Developers

I hope readers will pardon the carpentry pun, but Windows 10 is just around the corner, and Redmond’s new OS will create many possibilities for software and hardware developers.

Windows 10 represents a departure from Microsoft’s traditional OS strategy. It’s not just a new operating system, it’s an automatic and free update for millions of Windows 8.1 devices. It’s also designed to address a number of user complaints related to the Windows 8.x UI (formerly known as Metro design language or Metro UI). The changes aren’t just skin deep, as Windows 10 is not a mere redesign with a new UI and fancier apps; it might even mark the start of a new era for Microsoft, and in this post I will explain why.

First, let’s take a look at what Microsoft is trying to do in terms of addressing Windows 8.x foibles. After all, that’s what Windows 10 is all about, at least on the surface. Continue reading